SOMALIA FAMINE KILLED CLOSE TO 260,000 PEOPLE, REPORT SAYS

AFRICA – Between 2010 and 2012, more than a quarter of a million people died in the famine in Somalia — in part because the world was too slow to react, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Somalia said Thursday. Half of the 258,000 Somalis who died in the famine were children younger than 5, Philippe Lazzarini said in a statement. The report, jointly commissioned by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network, is the first scientific study on deaths in the crisis. It “confirms that we should have done more before famine was declared on 20 July 2011,” Lazzarini said. The world did not do enough after warnings in 2010 that starvation loomed following severe drought. And the people who needed help the most were extremely inaccessible, he said. “The suffering played out like a drama without witnesses.” A massive mobilization of the humanitarian community followed the official U.N. declaration of famine, said Lazzarini, which “helped mitigate the worst effects of the crisis.” The study, which covered the period from October 2010 to April 2012, suggests that an estimated 4.6% of the total population and 10% of children younger than 5 died in southern and central Somalia. In the worst-affected area, Lower Shabelle, close to one in five children younger than 5 died. At the peak of the crisis, between May and August 2011, famine and severe food insecurity claimed some 30,000 lives a month, the report said. The United Nations has been working with its humanitarian partners to change the way they operate, Lazzarini said. Some 2.7 million people in Somalia are still in need of life-saving assistance. “Our aim is to ensure that Somalia never goes through another famine again,” he said. “The world was too slow to respond to stark warnings of drought, exacerbated by conflict in Somalia, and people paid with their lives. These deaths could and should have been prevented, and such a shocking death toll must never be allowed to happen again.” World leaders meeting in London next week to discuss the situation in Somalia “must take steps to ensure that this was Somalia’s last famine,” Oxfam said. This means investing in long-term development, creating jobs, supporting farmers and pastoralists, and ensuring properly trained security forces to help achieve the “just and sustainable peace” the country so badly needs, it said. EP

2 responses to “SOMALIA FAMINE KILLED CLOSE TO 260,000 PEOPLE, REPORT SAYS

  1. Helpful information. Fortunate me I found your site by chance, and I’m shocked why this coincidence did not came about earlier! I bookmarked it.

  2. Thanks for the recommendations you have discussed here. Another thing I would like to express is that computer system memory needs generally go up along with other breakthroughs in the technology. For instance, any time new generations of cpus are brought to the market, there is usually an equivalent increase in the dimensions calls for of all laptop or computer memory and also hard drive space. This is because software program operated by means of these cpus will inevitably boost in power to make new technological innovation.

Comments are closed.